Veterans Day Ancestor Lineup

This Veterans Day stands apart from the rest, marking the 100th anniversary of the end of WWI.

I wondered how many of my direct line male ancestors served in some capacity.

I decided to make a chart tracking what I know of their service along with their Y DNA which represents that surname lineage. This was a fun project and will provide a discussion topic with family members at that not-too-distant holiday dinner.

Do you know how many ancestors you have that served their country?

Creating and sharing a chart like this just might result in a male descended from that same ancestor, or ancestral line who carries the surname today and is willing to Y DNA test. What a wonderful way to fill in that missing portion of your ancestor’s history.

If you are a male, carry the surname and descend from one of the men (or direct paternal lines) below, I have a DNA testing scholarship for you!

Name Birth Death Service Y DNA
William Sterling Estes October 1, 1901, 2 or 3 August 27, 1963 Army, WWI, 3 tours of duty R-ZS3700
John Y. Estes Dec. 29, 1818 September 19, 1895 Civil War, CSA, POW R-ZS3700
Samuel Claxton June 6, 1827 Dec. 5, 1876 Civil War, North, died as a result of injuries R-JFS2001
Jacob Kirsch May 1, 1841 July 23, 1917 Civil War, unproven, wife applied for pension Believe we have a tester
John R. Estes Mar-June, 1787 May 30, 1885 War of 1812, bounty land R-ZS3700
George Estes Feb. 3, 1763 July 1859 Revolutionary War, 3 enlistments R-ZS3700
Moses Estes 1711 1787 French and Indian War R-ZS3700
Marcus Younger Before 1740 1816 Revolutionary War Contributor I1-M253
Jacob Dobkins 1751 Augusta Co., VA March 4, 1833 Claiborne Co., TN Revolutionary War DNA Testing Scholarship Available
Lazarus Dodson 1760 1826 Claiborne Co., TN Revolutionary War R-P25
Capt. John Dobkins After 1787 Augusts Co., VA Revolutionary War DNA Testing Scholarship Available
William McNiel 1760/61 1830 Revolutionary War R-DF104
Rev. George McNiel 1720 June 7, 1805 Revolutionary War, unproven, Battle of King’s Mountain R-DF104
William Crumley III 1788 Feb. 18, 1859 War of 1812 I-M223
Henry Bolton 1759 Nov. 24, 1846 Revolutionary War, Pennsylvania Militia R-BBY69454
William Harrell 1789/90 October 8, 1859 War of 1812 I-P37
John Harrold 1761 1828/30 Revolutionary War I-P37
Michael McDowell 1747 After 1840 Revolutionary War R-Z16432
James Lee Clarkson/Claxton about 1775 Feb. 20, 1815, Fort Decatur, GA War of 1812, died in service R-JFS2001
Samuel Muncy 1740 ? Dunsmore’s War I-Y92887
Col. Robert Craven 1696 May 1782 French and Indian War R-M269
Abraham Workman April 27, 1708 1813 Militia I-M253
Jan Derik Woertman 1665 Revolutionary War I-M253
Nicholas Speak March 3, 1782 August 4, 1804 War of 1812 I-BY14004
Gideon Faires Before 1748 March 1821 Revolutionary War, Campaign Against the Cherokees DNA Testing Scholarship Available
Philip Jacob Miller 1726 September 1799 Rev War Militia R-CTS7822
Johann Nicholas Schaeffer Jan. 3, 1736 Jan. 20, 1796 Revolutionary War R-U106
William Hall June 8, 1651 July 11, 1727 Militia Uncertain if descendant has tested

I was surprised that there were 28 veterans. One, James Lee Claxton, died in the War of 1812 and Samuel Claxton, his grandson, died as a result of his service in the Civil War.

Philip Jacob Miller was a Brethren and managed to serve in the militia in spite of that.

Several men served in frontier forts.

Two men, my father and George Estes served 3 terms each.

Furthermore, all men in colonial times were militia members, so in essence, they all served in some capacity.

I’m sure there are more veterans whose service records I just haven’t discovered yet.

Discovering Your Veterans’ Haplogroups

If you would like to compile the Y haplogroups of your service veterans, or any other male lines, first check the Y DNA projects at Family Tree DNA to see if anyone has tested in your line by clicking here and scrolling down until you see the area to enter the surname you’re searching for.

Check the surname project to determine if any of the most distant ancestors listed are yours.

Then, find a male who carries that surname in your family line to Y DNA test to confirm a match to your surname line. No one listed from your line yet? Not everyone joins projects, so be sure to test. You’ll never know what you’ll learn.

I’m upgrading several of my Y lines to Big Y tests one by one. As genealogists, we want every scrap of information about our ancestors and what better tool to tell stories about the past than their own DNA.

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8 thoughts on “Veterans Day Ancestor Lineup

  1. You said, “all men in colonial times were militia members”. How does the DAR decide which of those who served in the militia is qualified for membership?

  2. Roberta ,
    Novel, “thinking outside the box,” means to obtain DNA test data.
    I also had Brethren who served. They were usually teamsters.
    Rudolf Meyers hauled supplies into Valley Forge during that cold winter for the war for independence.
    Two of Rudolfs descendants;Jacob Franklin Meyers(my ggrandfather) and his brother : Daniel Myers where teamsters during the Utah Expedition.
    Abraham Taylor wasn’t an anabaptist but he also was a teamster from New Milford, Connecticut who served a 6 month hitch and was discharged in Harrisburg near the end of the war for independence, 1780.
    Good luck on your search for the volunteers.

  3. Your Samuel Muncy is my fifth grand uncle. Jane Muncy was married to my third great-grandfather John C. Moore.

      • I don’t know. If it does, it is probably a 5-8 match.My tree is on Ancestry under TFCMay-May-Moore. My Gedmatch # is A971635. I am only sure of my Moores to John C. Moore b, 1795 in Montgomery Co. Virginia. He and Jane left Russell Co. after 1830 and went to Whitley Co..Kentucky. I know his father was a John and his mother was a Mary Elizabeth Ramsey. I have been looking at two families the Moore-Walkers and the Riley Moore-Holland. The Muncys were easier to trace. Nice to speak to you too.

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