Mitochondrial DNA Facebook Group Launches

Mitochondrial DNA has so much untapped potential!

Until now, there hasn’t been an online resource where one could go to find information about and specifically discuss mitochondrial DNA. Even more distressing, in many groups, when the topic of mitochondrial DNA arises, misinformation abounds, discouraging would-be testers.

New Group!

I’m very pleased to announce the new Facebook group, Mitochondrial DNA, here, founded by the National Geographic Society Genographic Project’s lead scientist, Dr. Miguel Vilar. As you know, the Genographic Project’s public participation phase has ended, but the scientific research for those who opted-in for science continues and Miguel is leading the way.

Miguel shares a lifelong passion for mitochondrial DNA, inherited by both males and females from their direct matrilineal line.

Different colored stars represent different Y DNA lines. Different colored hearts represent different mtDNA lines. The paternal and maternal grandfathers carry the mtDNA of their mothers, not shown here.

Mitochondrial DNA informs you about your mother’s mother’s mother’s line – the pink hearts above – both genealogically and historically. In other words, you can break down brick walls in your genealogy and understand the genesis of your matrilineal line before the advent of surnames. We can better answer the question, “where did I come from,” or more succinctly, where did our mother’s direct line come from.

In addition to Miguel, you’ll find other experts in the group, including members of the Million Mito Project, which I wrote about here.

  • Goran Rundfeldt heads the R&D team at FamilyTreeDNA.
  • Paul Maier is a population geneticist and member of the research team at FamilyTreeDNA. He specialized in toad and frog mtDNA in grad school and is now working on the new mitochondrial tree, for humans 😊, among other projects.
  • I’ve always been very interested in mitochondrial DNA, was a member of the Genographic Project design team and the first Genographic affiliate researcher. You can reference my Mitochondrial DNA resource page, here, which includes articles and step-by-step instructions for how to utilize mtDNA results.

Aside from the Million Mito research team, other Mitochondrial DNA group members with a special interest in mitochondrial DNA include:

As I scan down the list of members, I see several more highly qualified people.

Come On Over

Come on over and take a look for yourself to see what kinds of subjects are being discussed. Browse, ask a question, and contribute.

Send other people who have questions, are seeking advice, or are interested in what mitochondrial DNA can do for them.

Do you have a matrilineal brick wall you’d like to see fall? The first step is to test your mitochondrial DNA, preferably at the full sequence level to obtain as much information as possible. The more people who test, the better our chances of making meaningful connections.

Your mitochondrial DNA is a gift directly from your matrilineal ancestors. See what they have to say!

_____________________________________________________________

Disclosure

I receive a small contribution when you click on some of the links to vendors in my articles. This does NOT increase the price you pay but helps me to keep the lights on and this informational blog free for everyone. Please click on the links in the articles or to the vendors below if you are purchasing products or DNA testing.

Thank you so much.

DNA Purchases and Free Transfers

Genealogy Products and Services

Genealogy Research

10 thoughts on “Mitochondrial DNA Facebook Group Launches

  1. Thank you for letting us know. I look forward to hopefully getting more insight into Haplogroup I and my brick wall.

  2. When I went to the site linked, members were at 195. I quickly read through the posts, and when I was done the total was 240! This is a quickly growing group!

  3. Thank you for informing the genealogy community about the latest DNA projects. Unfortunately, I refuse to sign up for Facebook or any other social network, so it’s my lost. Hopefully another venue will appear.

  4. It looks like an interesting group. Just a suggestion…could you (or the admin) make it a private group? That way, only members can see posts. That would prevent facebook surfers from seeing potentially personal information. If I was a member, I would be more inclined to share if I knew only members could see it.

      • Please don’t make it private! There are many folk who do not want to join facebook, but like to see information on a particular topic. I am actively researching my rare maternal haplogroup and any info about it may be useful to me. Thanks 🙂

  5. Roberta, how accurate do you think the NatGeo’s mitochondrial DNA results are? I was very surprised at the time to get such a detailed result.

    FamilyTree DNA’s mtDNAPlus test has me as H.

    My daughter tested some years ago with 23andMe, and got H13a.

    Geno2 gave me H13a2b2.

  6. Three recent mtDNA matches at 0 GD, and not one but two blog posts from Roberta.
    I think the fates are sending me a massive nudge to do more with my mtDNA!
    My matches and I did have a crack a few years ago, but we need to go again – especially as there are additional resources and Project Groups at FTDNA.

Leave a Reply to Brenda Carter Cancel reply